“Nothing is real until it’s on television”

Image by Wells Baum

“It’s such an American thing that nothing is real until it’s on television.”

Tom Nichols

As Charlie Brown says after looking into the dark sky: “Let’s go inside and watch television. I’m beginning to feel insignificant.”

Camera obscura

Photo by Jeremy Yap
Sometimes it’s the written word. Other times, it’s a still photo. If the camera is too revealing, we can communicate via video or sound. Said filmmaker Robert Bresson’s in his 1975 book Notes on the Cinematograph: “A locomotive’s whistle imprints in us a whole railroad station.”
 
Communication is a game of elements. Film is the art of combining images and sounds; it excludes what overexplains or impresses.”One should not use the camera as if it were a broom.” A good filmmaker lets the mind dance with imagination.
 
A movie is a both a creative and viewing experience. It can be dull and instantly lively, like the pendulum of our everyday lives.
 
“My movie is born first in my head, dies on paper; is resuscitated by the living persons and real objects I use, which are killed on film but, placed in a certain order and projected on to a screen, come to life again like flowers in water.”
 

The annihilation of space by time

To be experienced. (Image via Kelsey Johnsen)

Tempus fugit. Time flies. But that’s because we allow technology to accelerate it.

When we speed through life as we scroll through our Instagram feeds, seeing everything as “pictures on a wall,” we don’t remember much. We get caught in looking at the rapidity of impressions rather than engaging in real wonders. We see the world like a rolling film and any pause causes a fight with intolerable boredom.

The rush to speed through life and accomplish all our goals in quick succession is the fastest way to reach “the annihilation of space by time.” But if we walk and slow down, we can catch the everyday moments in between. Slowness is what stimulates.

Technology flattens time and our expectations along with it. We expect everything to be instantly digestible, a downloadable shortcut. The time we spend digging deeper — experiencing– is what puts the bones in the goose. Acknowledging that “it will never be finished,” opens up space and time to dream.

Read A Model Railway Journey

A walk around the corner

Take a walk around the corner in any neighborhood. It can be a street or any other property that hides beyond your vision.

What do you see? Did you discover anything new like a barbershop, an abandoned building, or an alleyway of trash cans?

🚜◾️⬜️◾️

A photo posted by Wells Baum (@bombtune) on Oct 26, 2016 at 3:22pm PDT

 

You don’t have to travel far to explore the world. Some of the most interesting stuff is in your own backyard. Even the light shines differently back there.

View this post on Instagram

🙇 #motionstills

A post shared by Wells Baum (@bombtune) on

The farther you go, the more interesting it gets. Through walking you discover.

“The rhythm of walking generates a kind of rhythm of thinking, and the passage through a landscape echoes or stimulates the passage through a series of thoughts. This creates an odd consonance between internal and external passage, one that suggests that the mind is also a landscape of sorts and that walking is one way to traverse it.” – Rebecca Solnit, Wanderlust: A History of Walking